Veganic gardening

Has anyone got any experience of veganic growing? I’m a strict vegetarian, and my other half is vegan. I’ve recently taken over an allotment and would really like to avoid using manure and other animal products. My compost bin is brewing away nicely but doubt it will be enough to fertilise the whole allotment in the first year (still learning about composting). Any tips welcome.

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AFAIK, Melcourt Sylvagrow is vegan and Fertile Fibre definitely is. For bulk compost, I would find out about green waste compost from your local recycling centre; I pay £25 per tonne for bulk compost. Beware, you need to ensure their compost doesn’t contain pesticides or herbicides! Other alternatives include using washed up seaweed after a storm (will be references online), which is handy if you’re near the coast. Be sure to wash the salt off first! hth :slight_smile:

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Oh wow, I don’t know why I didn’t think of seaweed, I’m literally 2 minutes from the sea :smiley: will look into how to use it! Thanks heaps!!

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I have gone a few years on my allotment and at home using only vegan compost mulches and they work, though this year I did add a little horse manure to my plot because a fellow plot holder gave me a few barrow loads, which was kind.

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Look at compost teas for fertilising.
Also this book looks good: https://shop.permaculture.co.uk/the-vegan-book-of-permaculture.html

But it seems impossible to me to go completely vegan: You’ll need the worms and the bees.

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I guess the aim is to let them do things naturally and not take from them, like honey from a bee hive. Personally I think there is a balance as one of the great things in life is the way humans do befriend and work with animals - I think there is a way of doing it that works for us and them. E.g. taking only a little honey that doesn’t affect the hive, using eggs from free range happy chickens. But I appreciate that goes against some people’s sensibilities.

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I think one of the biggest outlays when starting on a new allotment is compost. Consider looking at Charles Dowding No Dig methods and buying in Green Waste compost in bulk or with other allotment holders to reduce costs. Some GW companies ‘tip’ the waste rather than bagging it which make it cheaper. You could also sow green manure over winter to improve fertility.

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