Has anyone grown Thalictrum? Looking for tips

I’m thinking of trialing this on my allotment for the first time this year and wondered if anyone has grown them before and if you have any words of advice around good cultivars / varieties, how long them flower for, conditions etc?

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Never heard of it! What is it?

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They’re generally a perennial that can be quite tall, they’re used in borders but usually for soil that is quite damp, so I’ve not tried them as both my garden and allotment are quite dry. But I thought for this year it might be worth at least giving them a go to get past my fear of them being tricky, when I actually think they might be quite easy. We’ll see!

I have some. They are fantastic value plants - tall and statuesque, some getting huge and they flower for months well into early winter. I will take some pics. A few were bought and some were from NGS local gardens. Mauve ones are huge. White ones slightly more delicate. I will find out more.

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Can you see this one? It’s huge already and will have sprays of lovely purple tiny flowers for months - so light and airy. Do give it a go. I guess the common ones are the easiest. Mine are in sun and shade. No problems.

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I used to grow some in partial shade and in soil which was slightly damp. The flowers are very pretty as they are so delicate but the foliage is attractive too.

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These look lovely and I’m homing in on words such as damp, shady - all good where I live, but is it hardy? :thinking:

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A plant that likes a damp place is ideal in our garden Jack! Glad it’s a perennial too as it hopefully will return if it gets a battering - would you say it’s hardy at all?? :thinking:

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I have some in full sun too and they’ve been fine. I believe they are hardy but I’m in sheltered London and not an expert at all.

Thanks for the advice Julie, I think I will get a couple to try on my allotment in shaded and sunnier positions to test them out there. I love the look of them and thought they may only flower for a short period so that’s reassuring they flower for a while.

Yes they’re one of those plants that is attractive at every stage!


I love it. It has taken a couple of years to establish but well worth the wait. I planted it in a sun-baked border but the base of the plant is shaded by other foliage. I would definitely go fo it!

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Hi Jack! I tried to grow the lovely T. delavayi in a shady spot in my garden which is located in one of the driest parts of Austria. It survived just a few months - it stayed really small and didn’t flower before it died. So I think the most crucial point is to have enough moisture. But that shouldn’t be a problem in UK, I think. :wink:

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Hi jack. One of the easiest thalictrums to grow is Thalictrum flavum sub sp glaucum. Happy in part shade or sunny dry and very hardy in North Yorkshire. Rochbraunianum is another good doer. The weakest seems to be the white variety splendid. Hope this helps a bit. You could do a trial with a few and see how they do. Think if your going into full sun a bit of TLC with water etc may pay off in the first year and a bit of mulch.

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Sorry that was meant to say glaucum

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Thanks for the tip Maria, I will bear that in mind when I try it out :slight_smile:

Hi Annie! Thank you, I will definitely try that one in that case. Lovely upright yellow stems, a good alternative to verbascum!

Just as an update, at Great Dixter this week they had some amazing Thalictrum growing. I ended up buying Thalictrum delavayi ‘Album’ as they didn’t have the others suggested above and I liked the look of this one for starters. Might be too dry on my allotment but we shall see!

I love my thalictrum, such a looker! Nice foliage even when the flowers are not in bloom :slight_smile:

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I can’t believe I’ve not grown them before. I’m really excited to plant mine and see how it grows and flowers :slight_smile: