February Flower Count 23rd February

For the last couple of years I’ve gone out into the garden on 23rd February and taken photos of everything in flower, including plants I’ve put in and plants/‘weeds’ that have turned up.

Partly to document the garden over the years, partly to make adjustments if needs be so that there’s more for the pollinators and partly to make me stop and look at and enjoy what I have.

I do another in April and another in September.

My question is, would anyone like to join me this year?

These are the flowers from last year 23/02/20

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What a great idea Amy! I love that and will try to do it if I can, we’re moving house next week so it might be a bit hectic but I will try. And what beautiful photos.

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Wow - very impressed with your photos… I can give it a go… any particular reason why you’ve chosen that date?!

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Maybe, if you can do your count at your new home, the information will come in handy.
I’m sure with all of the moving, in a few weeks time you might sit down and start to plan what you’d like to do with the garden and it’ll be handy to reflect on what there was at the end of Feb. It’ll help guide you on the type of thing that thrives in your new setting.

Good luck with the move. It sounds very exciting.
I’ve moved house half a dozen times. Moved county and country in amongst that and I don’t envy you the actual moving bit.
I hope it goes smoothly and don’t forget to stock up on snacks and microwavable/easy cook foods to keep you fuelled on the journey and through the unpacking :blush:

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I think the February Count is the one I started with and it was as simple as - one day I noticed some flowers and wondered how many types were in flower on that day.
After that I decided to do it every year as a photographic diary.

February can feel a bit bleak, but doing the count now makes me look at what’s alive and kicking in the garden.

The other dates I think I chose because those months seemed significant in the cycle of my garden and also significant in terms of checking if I’m providing enough for pollinators at times when they may need it most; when gardens that focus on flowers in high summer aren’t offering them as much.

I’m a visual person so the photos worked better for me than a written list (especially for those plants where I can’t remember the full name!).

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How lovely! What a great idea! I will try to join - but I think that there won’t be that much flowers here in cold Austria… :wink:

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:blush:
You might be surprised, once you start looking.
Also, 1 flower still counts :blossom:

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Lovely photos. We moved house at the beginning of October as everything was dying off so looking forward to seeing what comes up. Unfortunately lost a few things this winter with the extreme Scottish weather.My cordyline which was about 9ft high has definitely gone. I thought it could be saved by cutting it down to some lower shoots, but it was rotten and mushy all the way down so we dug it up last week.:sleepy: We actually lost all three cordyline and I think a ceonothus too.
I will take some photos when there is something to see in the garden. Just a few very tiny bulb shoots starting to push through at the moment. I look forward to seeing your next set of photos.

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I’m sorry to hear that you lost so many plants.
I imagine the larger one was quite some age as well.

Perhaps some people in this forum can suggest some extra hardy plants you could replace them with.

I saw a tweet earlier from Crug Farm, sharing a photo of Illicium macranthum which is apparently pretty hardy and has a lovely white flower. However, at £60 for a 5 litre pot, it’s quite an investment.

Yes I had the cordyline since 2012 and it had survived every winter, even the Beast from the Esst!! I lost them all this year, but we had consistently low temps of less than minus five. I have rhodedendrons which do well in Scotland and acers which seem to be ok. I think I may have lost a large fatsia as a lot of the leaves are going black and the growing tips have gone mushy so don’t know if any new leaves will grow. I will have aook into the Illicium macranthum as I will need to start restocking when the garden centres open again.

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February 23: no snowdrops but level of snow dropping fast.

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@AmyL I just remembered to take some photos of my flowers as the light was fading… I’ve included some green, as that’s important in my garden along with flowers!

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What it lacks in variety it makes up for in snowdrops!! :slight_smile:

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Lovely!
Lots of colour and lots that are good for pollinators :blush:

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Worth recording even if there’s nothing in flower.
Next year may be different.

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Oh. Look at those snowdrops!
The crocus bring a lovely splash of colour.

Hope you’re settling in well :blush:

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Right then!

Here’s my count from today (23/02/2021).

Less than last year, but still not bad.
23 in total. I’m counting the hazel catkins as flowers as well as the male flower.

I’ve seen a few bees the past couple of days so I’m especially pleased that there’s something to offer them.

I think my neighbours are used to seeing me crawling through the garden, taking photos by now :sweat_smile:

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Beautiful snowdrops!

Impressive! Lovely combination

Holy smokes, so many! Very beautiful, this is great, thanks for starting it Amy :slight_smile: I hope to have many more in the next round :slight_smile: We’re settling in well thank you, trying to figure all the new hearting setting and bills etc out but getting there!

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